Bob & LBF in the Morning

Bob & LBF in the Morning

Snow falls at Fenway Park during practice.

Say it ain’t SNOW!

9 Times It Snowed Like Crazy in Spring and Summer in Boston.

It’s been a pretty disappointing winter when it comes to snow, so a lot of you are putting the shovels and salt back in the garage and breaking out the beach chairs and sunscreen.

NOT SO FAST.

Oh, Boston, the city that loves to surprise you with a snowstorm in the middle of spring or summer. Just when you thought it was safe to put away your shovels and break out the flip flops, Mother Nature decides to throw a curveball and dump a foot of snow on your lawn.

Yet, there are 9 Times It Significantly Snowed in Spring and Summer in Boston.

It’s truly a remarkable feat to see snowflakes falling from the sky in the middle of June, but leave it to Boston to make it happen.

(1816. For reals.)

Maybe it’s the city’s way of reminding us that we can never let our guard down when it comes to the weather.

But let’s be real, snowstorms in spring and summer are just plain annoying.

Who wants to be digging their car out of a snowbank when it’s supposed to be beach weather?

It’s like Boston is trying to see how many seasons it can fit into one day.

And let’s not forget about the havoc these snowstorms wreak on the city’s infrastructure.

One inch of snow can bring Boston’s public transportation system to a screeching halt (thanks MBTA!). So you can only imagine the chaos that ensues when there’s a full-blown snowstorm in the middle of July.

But hey, at least we can take solace in the fact that we’re not alone in our suffering.

Other cities, like Minneapolis and Denver, have also experienced their fair share of spring and summer snowstorms. Misery loves company, right?

So, to all the weather gods out there, can we please just stick to the seasons that are assigned to us?

We’ll happily take our winter snow and summer heat in their designated months. We don’t need any surprise visits from Jack Frost in June or July. Boston has enough surprises as it is.

  • March 31-April 1, 1997

    Dubbed the April Fool’s Day storm, it snowed 22.4 inches in Boston. The wet, heavy snow came down at 3 inches an hour at some points. April Fool’s indeed!

  • April 4 - 5, 2016

    Boston broke snowfall and low temp records. A record of 6.6 inches of snow was set in Boston.

  • April 6, 1982

    10.8 inches
    The “Northeast Blizzard of ’82” brought 1-2 feet of snow to parts of SNE. This single storm put April 1982 as one of the top 5 snowiest Aprils on record.

  • April 9, 1917

    9.1 inches
    Winter Leisure

  • April 13, 1953

    2.2 inches
    Duchess Skiing

  • April 13, 1933

    5 inches of snow in Boston
    Winter Sports

  • April 13, 1918

    4.2 inches
    Shovelling Snow

  • May 9, 1977

    a snowstorm slammed parts of the Northeast, dumping as much as 20 inches of snow in parts of Massachusetts.

    Boston’s Logan airport only picked up a 1/2 inch of snow, but areas away from the coast saw significant snow. Worcester measured over a foot of snow, Bedford received 9 1/2 inches, Milton saw almost 8 inches and Providence had 7 inches.

  • June 1816

    On June 6 and 7, 1816, a big, old snowstorm hit northern New York and New England, with several areas recording 6 inches of snow. Boston had snow flurries on the 7th. According to celebrateboston.com, “In the northern parts of the state [VT], about the same time, snow fell in considerable quantities. In the town of Cabot it was 18 inches deep on the 8th of June.”

    'American Homestead Winter'

    In a Currier & Ives print titled ‘American Homestead Winter,’ a man with his dog carries firewood to his home as a couple in a horse-drawn slegh pass him on the road, 1868. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

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