Dirty Laundry

Samuel L. Jackson attends the "The Piano Lesson" Broadway photocall at The Skylark on September 07, 2022 in New York City. Quentin Tarantino attends the close encounter red carpet during the 16th Rome Film Fest 2021 on October 19, 2021 in Rome, Italy.

Samuel L. Jackson is challenging his frequent director Quentin Tarantino over his criticism that Marvel actors are not really “movie stars.” Last week, the Pulp Fiction director said that  all of the movies being made today are affected by the “Marvel-ization of Hollywood.” Tarantino, 59, told Variety, “My only axe to grind against them is they’re the only things that seem to be made. And they’re the only things that seem to generate any kind of excitement amongst a fan base or even for the studio making them. That’s what they’re excited about. And so it’s just the fact that they are the entire representation of this era of movies right now. There’s not really much room for anything else. That’s my problem.”

Jackson, 73, has starred in a number of Tarantino movies, including Pulp Fiction, Jackie Brown, The Hateful Eight, and Django Unchained. He has also appeared in a number of Marvel movies as director of S.H.I.E.L.D. Nick Fury. Appearing on The View Tuesday (November 29), he said, “Okay, well, it takes an actor to be those particular characters. And the sign of movie stardom has always been, what: a–es in seats?” Jackson said while shrugging, “What are we talking about? It’s not a big controversy for me to know that apparently, these actors are movie stars.”

Jackson Chadwick specifically pointed out the late Chadwick Boseman — whose film Black Panther was nominated for Best Picture at the Oscars — as well as Scarlett Johansson. “Chadwick Boseman is Black Panther. You can’t refute that, and he’s a movie star.”

Watch the interview below:

Samuel L. isn't the only Marvel actor to speak out against Tarantino’s comments. Shang Chi star Simu Liu wrote on Twitter: “If the only gatekeepers to movie stardom came from Tarantino and Scorsese, I would never have had the opportunity to lead a $400 million plus movie. I am in awe of their filmmaking genius. They are transcendent auteurs. But they don’t get to point their nose at me or anyone.” He added in a thread: “No movie studio is or ever will be perfect. But I’m proud to work with one that has made sustained efforts to improve diversity onscreen by creating heroes that empower and inspire people of all communities everywhere. I loved the ‘Golden Age’ too.. but it was white as hell.”