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America's Opioid Crisis Is Not A One Sided Affair

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The following article is the kind that continues to stigmatize those who have become addicted to opioids/opiates (not to mention other substances).

I've said it before and I will say it again: NO ONE INTENDS OR INTENDED TO "ABUSE" OPIOIDS. BY THE TIME IT GETS TO THE "ABUSE" STAGE, THE CHEMICAL IS IN CONTROL. If someone is MISUSING opioids, prescribed or otherwise, it is because opioids are ADDICTIVE, NOT BECAUSE THE PERSON WANTED TO RUIN THEIR LIFE AND THE LIVES OF THE PEOPLE WHO LOVE THEM.

Big pharma was and is well aware of the fact that their product(s) were (are) addictive when they began marketing them. These drugs were not intended to be prescribed for "pain on the scale of 1 to 10". That "pain scale" was concocted by pharma. These drugs were intended for end of life cancer pain. Pharma saw an opportunity to make beaucoup bucks and ran with it. Because of their greed, thousands have unnecessarily lost their loved ones.

The Secretive Family Making Billions From the Opioid Crisis

You're aware America is under siege, fighting an opioid crisis that has exploded into a public-health emergency. You've heard of OxyContin, the pain medication to which countless patients have become addicted. But do you know that the company that makes Oxy and reaps the billions of dollars in profits it generates is owned by one family?

It's extremely important to change the language around addiction. Saying someone is "abusing" a drug infers the intention to do so and shames the person who is in the grips of addiction and I for one am sick and tired of people being treated as less than human for becoming addicted to an addictive product and exhibiting the resulting symptoms of addiction!

These powerfully addictive "pain medications" were intended for dying cancer patients:

In the years before it swooped into the pain-management business, Purdue had been a small industry player, specializing in over-the-counter remedies like ear-wax remover and laxatives. Its most successful product, acquired in 1966, was Betadine, a powerful antiseptic purchased in industrial quantities by the U. S. government to prevent infection among wounded soldiers in Vietnam. The turning point, according to company lore, came in 1972, when a London doctor working for Cicely Saunders, the Florence Nightingale of the modern hospice movement, approached Napp with the idea of creating a timed-release morphine pill. A long-acting morphine pill, the doctor reasoned, would allow dying cancer patients to sleep through the night without an IV. At the time, treatment with opioids was stigmatized in the United States, owing in part to a heroin epidemic fueled by returning Vietnam veterans. “Opiophobia,” as it came to be called, prevented skittish doctors from treating most patients, including nearly all infants, with strong pain medication of any kind. In hospice care, though, addiction was not a concern: It didn’t matter whether terminal patients became hooked in their final days. Over the course of the seventies, building on a slow-release technology the company had already developed for an asthma medication, Napp created what came to be known as the “Contin” system. In 1981, Napp introduced a timed-release morphine pill in the UK; six years later, Purdue brought the same drug to market in the U. S. as MS Contin.

Our "healthcare" system has and/or can come up with safer alternatives than the addictive poison they're currently selling.

And in the meantime, just because someone in a white coat with a stethoscope wrapped around their neck suggests you take something, it's ok to do some research first, ask for other options and decline the suggestion if you'd like. The doctor works for you, not big pharma.

I would also add: do your research before committing to any course of treatment and/or treatment center as there are many "for profit" treatment centers that are more than happy to take your money with  no guarantee of sobriety.

Julie Devereaux

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Believe it or not, there is another side to America’s opioid crisis. With the changes in prescription guidelines, many people have been left without the care they need.

One can’t deny that the loose method of prescribing opioids in the 90’s and early 2000’s majorly contributed to what is now America’s opioid crisis. But, restrictions have made it harder for the people who actually need the medicine to obtain it without jumping through hoops.

According to The Hill, the prescribing of opioids has dropped every year since 2012 and is at a severe low, yet drug overdose deaths continue to rise.

Studies have shown that when opioids are prescribed properly and are followed up on, the risk of addiction and abuse goes down significantly. In fact, the majority of people who have misused prescription opioids were not prescribed them previously.

There are many patients that use opioids to allow them to maintain a job and live a comfortable painless life. Unfortunately for them, it is the abusers and wrongful doing doctors that make it hard for them to continue that life.

If you or a loved one are going through tough times dealing with opioid addiction, call the American Addiction Center at:

877-493-8518 (Privacy Guaranteed)

 

Chris is a writer and social media guru who is known for channeling his creativity. He offers valuable insight regarding trending topics in hip hop, sports, fashion/streetwear, and tech news. Follow @REALschweitz on Twitter